clapper

Video camera cyclists tips

Some of us have got a lot of experience in using cameras and making videos, here are some top tips from some of the well-known users.

  • Subscribe to all other video camera cyclists. Watch their videos and comment on them. This will help others get to know you, they will subscribe back and watch your videos. In turn giving you feedback and helping your channel grow.
  • Test your camera set up before you hit the road. Too much sky or too much road will leave out vital detail and can affect the quality of your video.
  • Brush up on your cycling skills. Read CycleCraft or take a bikeability course. You are openly displaying how you ride and you can affect people’s opinions of cyclists and video camera cyclists.
  • Learn from your mistakes. You are in a unique position to replay what happened without your memory affecting it. Learn from your mistakes and don’t make them again.
  • Take constructive criticism from others. With other video camera cyclists watching your videos, they may pick up on something which is unsafe / best avoided and they may comment on that.
  • Don’t take stupid criticism. Some people know nothing about the road network, or how to ride a bicycle on it. They usually spout off about riding as close to the pavement as possible etc.. These people are best ignored / deleted and blocked.
  • Try to keep your head still. A still video is more watchable than a bumpy one. Securely fastening your camera and using a wider lens angle can help with this. Obviously shoulder check and look around were needed.
  • Try to keep your temper and anger under control. Whilst it is understandable that when someone has almost collided with you and nearly knocked you off your bicycle. It can make us look bad and the aggressor in the eyes of the public. The police will understand if you swear as the incident happens, that is after all human nature. If however you continue to use foul language and they may choose to prosecute under section 5 of the Public Order Act.
  • Avoid confronting motorists. Remember you have the incident on video and can report it to the police. You have no idea what kind of person the motorist is, they may have a weapon close to hand and be ready to use it.
  • Call out number plates as the camera may not pick it up.
  • Avoid the muvi clones, they are generally rubbish (poor battery life, not weather proof and a narrow lens angle)

With thanks to 4ChordsNoNet, growingvegetableMaidstoneonbikerfrst and SkrzypczykBass

Do you have any tips for video camera cyclists? Let us know in the comments below.

5 thoughts on “Video camera cyclists tips”

  1. Just a thought on “Try to keep your temper and anger under control. Whilst it is understandable that when someone has almost collided with you and nearly knocked you off your bicycle. It can make us look bad and the aggressor in the eyes of the public.”

    I’ve no problems with this – but there’s a wee tweak too? As a singularly foul-mouthed cyclist (on occasion), there’s foul language (bellowed out in anger and aggression), and foul language (bellowed out in fear and anger). Ime – police do not like the former (rightly) but understand the latter.

  2. Good tips, everyone who helped.

    I think another good tip is to add that the video should contain a screenshot of the offending vehicle’s licence plate, and if the driver was on the phone or passing too closely, also getting a screenshot of the phone user or close pass, and putting those at the end of the video, as well as putting the licence plate in the title, the description, and in the tags. I also put a description of the car with the licence plate in the description as well.

  3. If you are going to report the incident to the police upload a second ‘unlisted’ video of the raw footage including a good lead in to the incident and a decent amount of post incident footage.

Leave a Reply